Differing Degrees of Misery is still Misery

Just how much money do you need to be among the global 1 percent? According to the 2018 Global Wealth Report from Credit Suisse Research Institute, you need a net worth of $871,320 U.S. or $1,141,429.20 CDN using an exchange rate of 1.31 as of the time of this post. Credit Suisse defines net worth, or “wealth,” as “the value of financial assets plus real assets (principally housing) owned by households, minus their debts.” From page 29 of the report specifically addressing Canada, the average wealth per adult in Canada, at USD 288,260 ($377,620 CDN), is 29% lower than that…

Consumer Cannon Fodder

Good news for long abused savers while long favoured debtors are nudged a little closer to the precipice. It appears overindebted Canadian consumers can now officially consider themselves nothing but cannon fodder at the Bank of Canada. Governor Stephen Poloz and his deputies on the Governing Council raised the benchmark interest rate a quarter-point to 1.75 per cent today, as expected. They said they feel pretty good about the economy, now that politicians in Canada, Mexico, and the United States have agreed on a revised trade agreement, and that evidence suggests Canadian households are adjusting well to higher borrowing costs.…

CPA Survey of Employees

More evidence was released in September that an alarming proportion of Canadians are in financial quicksand. The Canadian Payroll Association’s annual survey shows 40 per cent of working Canadians feel “overwhelmed” by their debt, with more than one-third of respondents saying they loaded up on leverage over the last year. (Will we ever learn). Meanwhile, one-fifth of respondents said they wouldn’t be able to scrape together $2,000 within a month in case of emergency. Other disturbing data points include: • 44% of Canadians live pay cheque to pay cheque • 46% say financial stress is impacting their workplace performance •…

A Deeper Dive on Business Bankruptcies/Proposals

Our intent is not to fear monger or spread doom and gloom. We’re not economists. Nor do we consider ourselves thought leaders by any stretch of the imagination however, our purpose is to hopefully provide some additional considerations for those who are interested in gaining the best possible understanding of our world beyond the headlines. As reported by the ATB Owl last week (businesses) insolvencies are on the rise, but not as much as one might expect. In the second quarter of 2018, businesses filed a total of 41 insolvencies. That’s up from only 31 in the first quarter of…

Consumers worried? Really?

  Nearly 60 per cent of Canadians have changed their behaviour by doing things such as cutting back on spending on both extras and essentials to brace themselves for rising interest rates, a new survey from Manulife Bank suggests. Among those who have taken steps to prepare for higher rates, 27 per cent pared back on entertainment such as movies and bars, 17 per cent put more money into savings accounts, and 10 per cent spent less on essential items, such as groceries, the poll data showed. The online survey of 2,003 Canadians was conducted between May 11 and 14,…

Understanding Tin Foil Hats

Never judge a man by the fact that he may be wearing a tin-foil hat. Rather seek to understand the reasons why. We found one such item that, either downplayed or completely absent from the mainstream, may drive some to question true reality from the reality that the masses are fed. Impaired Mortgages Soar at Canadian Banks A new accounting framework adopted by Canadian banks is sending impaired loan numbers soaring. TheInternational Accounting Standards Board (IASB) released a new standard, improving accounting transparency in a few key areas. The standard, known as IFRS-9, became mandatory for members starting January 2018. Despite…

Debt Trap!

The day of reckoning for over indebted Canadians does not appear to be coming soon, but a new survey indicates a rising proportion of Canadians fear the fallout from higher interest rates. Thirty-three per cent of respondents to a survey conducted on behalf of MNP said they could be pushed toward bankruptcy due to rising rates.   That’s up five percentage points over the last six months. The Bank of Canada has raised interest rates three times since last summer, taking its benchmark policy rate to 1.25 percent. Although the Bank of Canada announced on April 18, 2018 that Canada’s key…

Our Head-In-Ass Phenomenon & Interest Rates

Like many central bankers nowadays Stephen Poloz, Governor of the Bank of Canada, finds himself in a bit of a pickle these days. Like central bankers elsewhere, Poloz is trying to figure out how to bring historically low interest rates to more normal levels without inadvertently triggering another downturn. To walk that line, he must answer two questions: where is normal; and how quickly should policy makers raise borrowing costs to get there? In his comments in late April at a media roundtable in Washington where he was attending the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Poloz gave…

Global Gluttony Continues

Taking on debt in basic terms simply means stealing from our future income in order to purchase or consume something today. If we do enough of it what will be left of our future income in order to purchase or consume in the future?  Is there not an inevitable wall that will be hit?  Will the bowl of popcorn not eventually register empty if we gorge and stuff our faces in two fisted fashion? Speaking of two fisted gluttony global debt jumped to a record $237 Trillion last year. Norway, Canada, Sweden and China all exceeded 2008 pre-crisis debt levels…

Sustainability; just a fancy new word for “common sense”

A few years ago, BC Comfort Air Conditioning, a B.C.-based company with over 45 years experience in mechanical HVAC services, noted employees were leaving the doors wide open in the chilly season for convenience. One simple change—asking workers to keep that bay door closed—helped cut natural gas use by 65%, saving the company $7,000 a year and reducing carbon emissions by the same amount as planting 500 trees. The company appears as one of 12 case studies in a new report, 200 Million Tonnes of Opportunity: How small and medium-sized businesses are driving Canadian clean growth, a report from Climate…